Children’s Health

A new analysis published in JAMA Network Open by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in collaboration with a retired UCSF professor reveals ongoing and worsening adolescent e-cigarette addiction in the United States. In the analysis of data from the annual National Youth Tobacco Survey, a nationally-representative survey of middle and high school students in
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Watching violent TV during the preschool years can lead to later risks of psychological and academic impairment, the summer before middle school starts, according to a new study led by Linda Pagani, a professor at Université de Montréal’s School of Psycho-Education. The study is published in the Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. Before now,
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Inflammatory bowel disease is a risk factor for giving birth preterm even when in apparent disease remission, a University of Gothenburg study shows. If corroborated, the results may eventually affect recommendations for women with ulcerative colitis who tries to conceive. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is chronic inflammatory disease with a prevalence of approximately 0.5 percent.
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A genetic test known as chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) could help identify the cause of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) or its counterpart in older children, known as sudden unexplained death in childhood (SUDC), finds a study led by Boston Children’s Hospital. The researchers, led by Richard Goldstein, MD, Ingrid Holm, MD, MPH, and Catherine
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Semaglutide is a glucagon-like peptide-1 analog that can reduce hunger, thus supporting weight loss. In a recent New England Journal of Medicine study, researchers report that a weekly dose of semaglutide led to a significant body mass index (BMI) reduction in adolescents. Study: Once-Weekly Semaglutide in Adolescents with Obesity. Image Credit: SKT Studio / Shutterstock.com Obesity
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The Endocrine Society rebukes the Florida Board of Medicine’s decision to ban gender-affirming care for transgender and gender-diverse teenagers. We call on the Florida Board of Medicine to reverse the ban and allow physicians to provide evidence-based care and protect the lives of minors. The Florida ban is blatantly discriminatory and contradicts medical evidence followed by the
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A recent editorial published in the journal BMC Medicine examined existing literature for associations between the mother’s and offspring’s health outcomes and a broad range of maternal characteristics related to pregnancy and postnatal phenotypes and complications. Study: Maternal factors during pregnancy influencing maternal, fetal, and childhood outcomes. Image Credit: Marc Roura / Shutterstock Background A large body
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Innate lymphoid cells are a recently discovered family of white blood cells that reside in the skin, gastrointestinal tract, airways and other barrier tissues of the body. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) have an essential role in protecting these tissues from parasitic infections as well as damage associated with allergic inflammation and asthma, according
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Using human brain organoids, an international team of researchers, led by scientists at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Sanford Consortium, has shown how the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19 infects cortical neurons and specifically destroys their synapses -; the connections between brain cells that allow them to communicate with each other.
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Scientists at the UNC School of Medicine and UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, in collaboration with a team from Queen Mary University of London, have illuminated the molecular events underlying an inherited movement and neurodegenerative disorder known as ARSACS – Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay, named for two Quebec valleys where the first cases
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A targeted therapy for children with high-risk Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) was shown to significantly reduce relapse rates when tested in a large multicenter clinical trial conducted by the Children’s Oncology Group (COG) and led by pediatric oncologists at Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University. By
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As the American economy has undergone rapid and dramatic change, so too has America’s workforce. Trending terms, such as “the great resignation” and “quiet quitting,” have been coined as we seek to better understand workplace challenges across the country. There have been many contributing factors reported to be driving these issues, but new research shows
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With the annual change from daylight saving time to standard time approaching on Sunday, Nov. 6, a new position statement from the Sleep Research Society is advocating for the elimination of daylight saving time and the adoption of permanent standard time. The position statement was published online Sept. 26 as an advance article in the
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Caffeine consumption today occurs in the form of tea, coffee, and caffeinated soft drink consumption, most commonly. With the stimulant effect of coffee, most people find it difficult to cut back, despite concerns about its health consequences. A new paper published in JAMA Network Open discusses the relationship between caffeine consumption in pregnancy and the
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Among children who experienced in-hospital cardiac arrest in the last 20 years, survival rates have increased significantly. Greater improvements have been seen among children who had recent cardiac surgery and cardiac arrest, with lesser gains in survival seen among children who had cardiovascular disease (CVD) and no recent history of cardiac surgery, according to preliminary
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