Children’s Health

Breastfed babies are believed to suffer fewer allergic conditions, like eczema and food allergies, than formula-fed babies; yet the reason has not been well understood. Now, a new study by Penn State College of Medicine finds that small molecules found in most humans’ breast milk may reduce the likelihood of infants developing allergic conditions like
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Researchers from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) found disparities in the completion of follow-up concussion care, particularly among pediatric patients who are publicly insured and identify as Black, suggesting barriers to care exist. The findings, recently published in the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, will help inform research funded by a newly awarded grant from
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Public Health authorities have warned health care workers to be on the alert for polio, yet most physicians will not be familiar with presentation of this highly infectious, life-threatening disease. An article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) https://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.221320 outlines five things to know about polio. The oral polio vaccine is used internationally, but not
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Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have identified one of the reasons why the childhood cancer neuroblastoma becomes resistant to chemotherapy. The findings are significant for how future treatments should be designed. The results have been published in Science Advances. Neuroblastoma is an aggressive cancer of the sympathetic nervous system, especially of the adrenal gland.
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Social determinants of health affect the outcomes of many illnesses, and pediatric cancer is no exception. In fact, children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) living in poverty are significantly more likely to relapse and die from their disease than those from wealthier backgrounds. While socioeconomic status often influences survival outcomes, children with relapsed/refractory ALL treated
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Infection with the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of respiratory illness among both infants and young children throughout the world, as well as the most common cause of infant hospitalizations in the United States. Although RSV cases typically peak between December and February, RSV hospitalizations are reaching similarly high levels much
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The largest clinical trial ever conducted in infants younger than age 1 undergoing heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass found that administering steroids during surgery did not improve post-operative outcomes compared to placebo, according to preliminary late-breaking research to be presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2022. The meeting, held in person in Chicago
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The Terasaki Institute for Biomedical Innovation (TIBI) will be hosting the Terasaki Innovation Summit on March 8-10, 2023, at the UCLA Meyer & Renee Luskin Center in Los Angeles. This inaugural event will focus on improving technological and entrepreneurial translation of personalized medicines – bringing biomedical innovations from the laboratory to the real world. Featuring
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A new study from investigators at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, a founding member of Mass General Brigham, the University of Virginia School of Medicine, and the University of Pittsburgh, finds that COVID-19 “Test to Treat” sites -; clinical centers launched based on a federal initiative to provide free testing, diagnosis, and immediate access to COVID-19
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Pregnant people who received one of the mRNA COVID-19 vaccines had 10-fold higher antibody concentrations than those who were naturally infected with SARS-CoV-2, a finding that was also observed in their babies, according to a new study by researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the University of Pennsylvania. The study, published today in
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Using cutting edge molecular techniques in rodent models, researchers are dissecting the neurobiological mechanisms impacted by early life adversity. The findings were presented at Neuroscience 2022, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world’s largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. Childhood adversity, such as abuse, neglect, poverty, lack
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Early diagnosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is key to managing progression of the disease. A new technique analyzing urine extracellular vesicles (uEVs) -; cell-derived nanoscale spherical structures involved in multiple biological functions -; in urine samples identifies changes in the kidneys earlier than conventional methods and can also predict renal function decline. A team
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New research presented this week at ACR Convergence 2022, the American College of Rheumatology’s annual meeting, shows that spine disease, once considered a rarity in chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis, affects as many as 10-35% of patients and is asymptomatic in one-third (Abstract #1942). Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is an autoinflammatory bone disease, mainly affecting
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Depression and anxiety in the parents of children with asthma have been associated with increased clinic visits and asthma-related hospitalizations. Curbing depression among these caregivers improves control of asthma and lung function, partially through effective treatment of the child’s own depression, a new study by UT Southwestern O’Donnell Brain Institute researchers finds. Asthma is the
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In a recent study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal, researchers assessed the impact of infant-directed singing on the social visual behavior of the infant. Study: Music of infant-directed singing entrains infants’ social visual behavior. Image Credit: Prostock-studio/Shutterstock Background When children are young, caretakers sing to them to calm, appease
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